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"Corellian Spike" was a variation of sabacc that used a 62-card deck and two six-sided dice called "spike dice." The object of the game was to achieve a card total closest to 0. When the dice rolled doubles, each player's hand was discarded and replaced by unseen cards from the deck, which could improve or ruin their hand.

CardsEdit

Corellian Spike deck

A deck of Corellian Spike sabacc

The Corellian Spike variation of sabacc was played with a smaller deck, comprising only 62 cards[3] rather than 76.[4] There were 60 pip cards: three sets of green cards with positive values ranging from 1 to 10, and three sets of red cards with negative values ranging from -10 to -1.[2] Finally, there were two 0-value cards referred to as sylops (Old Corellian for "idiots").[3]

The game also made use of two "spike dice",[3] which were rolled thrice per round to shake things up.[5]

GameplayEdit

Unlike regular sabacc,[6] the object of Corellian Spike was to collect a hand as close to a value of 0 as possible.[3]

Each game lasted three rounds. At the start of the first round, each player placed two credits in the game pot, and one in the sabacc pot. The dealer then dealt each player two cards, which they kept secret. The remaining cards, placed face down, constituted the draw pile.[5]

Starting from the dealer's left, the players betting saw a player's bet, raised a bet, stood, or decided to junk their cards. In the latter case, their cards were discarded, face up, on the discard pile. A player who chose discard their cards was out of the game until the next round started.[5]

At the end of the betting phase, the dealer dealt each remaining player a third card face up, the spike card. At that point, each player had the opportunity to buy a card for two credits added to the game pot. If they chose to do so, they were given the top card face down from the draw pile. After that, they could either discard the new card, swap it with one of the two cards in their hand, or swap it with the spike card.[5]

Then, the players bet again. The dealer would then roll the two spike dice. If the symbols were the same but not double spikes, all active players had to discard two cards from their hands, and were dealt two new ones. If double spikes were rolled, however, all active players had to discard all three cards and were given new ones, with the new spike card once again face up.[5]

The sequence "option to buy a card, betting, and rolling of the dice" would then occur again two more times in succession. At that point, if more than one player remained, players all revealed their hands. The one with the best hand won the game pot. If said hand had a value of exactly zero, the player in question also won the sabacc pot.[5]

Winning handsEdit

There existed several versions of the rules, with different hierarchies of winning hands.[5] In one version, the best winning hand was called "Pure Sabacc," consisting of two +10, two -10, and a sylop (0).[7] Other possible winning hands in that version of the rules included the plain "Sabacc" (two 10 and two -10), the "Straight Khyron" (7, -8, -9, 10), and the "Gee Whiz" (3, 4, 1, 2, -10).[2]

According to the Yarith Bespin casino's house rules, the best winning hand was the "Idiot's Array," consisting of a sylop (0) coupled with a +2 and a +3. In that system, the next best hand was the "Prime Sabacc," which consisted of a +10, a -10, and a sylop (0).[5]

HistoryEdit

In 10 BBY,[8] Han Solo won the Millennium Falcon from Lando Calrissian in a game of "Corellian Spike" sabacc.[1]

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