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Paul Griffin

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Paul Griffin (born August 18, 1960 in Ontario, Canada) worked on the visual effects creature animation for the first two Star Wars prequels, as well as Star Wars: Bounty Hunter cinematic sequences for the game by LucasArts. He was responsible for supervising all droid animation from the middle to the end of Star Wars: Episode II Attack of the Clones including battle scenes as well as the animation for much of the Gungan parade at the end of Star Wars: Episode I The Phantom Menace. His other well known contributions include work on Jurassic Park III, The Mummy Returns, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, visual development for King Kong and supervision of the facial animation seen in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button. Griffin has rekindled his connection to cartoon animation and was a contributor on Happy Feet Two in 2011.

While at Industrial Light and Magic, Griffin was responsible for some notable innovations that helped streamline work flow.

One useful concept was Cuts, a production level tool that allowed artists to drop their work-in-progress tests directly into the master show cut on demand so that they could check continuity and pacing of their shots in context without having to wait for dailies to see and correct errors. The features of Cuts were found to be so beneficial to the film making process as well as timesaving, they were eventually incorporated into Loupe, the primary viewing tool used throughout the ILM facility and in time the same concepts have been adopted by other studios in the visual effects industry.

In 1996, Griffin also suggested a tool to the CG Commericals Department that would allow ILM to review shots simultaneously in studio and at remote client locations by using proprietary software running over the internet to control playback at each location. Today a similar commercial product exists with this function known as Cinesync.

Noting that it was often difficult to see or be seen in tiny screening rooms, Griffin suggested that ILM develop bleachers, or "stadium seating" and this has become standard practice even in tiny theatres.


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